A randomized, placebo and active controlled, split scalp study to evaluate the efficacy of platelet-rich plasma in patchy alopecia areata of the scalp

Pallavi Hegde, Vineet Relhan, Bijaylaxmi Sahoo, Vijay Kumar Garg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a new modality of treatment in the field of dermatology. There are paucity of studies evaluating the effects of PRP in nonscarring alopecia especially alopecia areata (AA). To compare the efficacy and safety of PRP in patchy AA of the scalp in a placebo and active controlled trial. This was a randomized, placebo and active controlled, split scalp study. Fifty patients of patchy AA of the scalp were recruited and allocated to two treatment groups. Left side of the scalp received placebo (intralesional normal saline), right side of the scalp received intralesional PRP in one group and intralesional triamcinolone acetonide in second group. Three treatment sessions were given at 4-week interval and final follow-up was done at 8 weeks later. SALT scoring, dermoscopy were the parameters used to assess the efficacy. The SALT score showed statistically significant improvement from baseline in both the treatment groups (P value <.001). The maximum absolute regrowth was shown by the steroid group followed by PRP followed by placebo group (P value.016). Improvement in dermoscopic findings were similar in both the PRP and steroid groups followed by placebo (P value.448). PRP is a promising therapy in AA as an adjuvant in those with minimal response and those not tolerating steroids or have developed adverse effects to it.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere14388
JournalDermatologic Therapy
Volume33
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01-11-2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

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