Effect of scapular taping on pain, disability and proprioception in subjects with shoulder impingement syndrome: A randomized controlled trial

Mridu Gautam, Prem Venkatesan, Nithin Prakash, Hemant K. Kalyan, Karvannan Harikesavan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Context: Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS) is a common clinical condition in general practice and overhead athletes. Alterations in the scapular position can lead to shoulder impingement syndrome. The effect of exercises on shoulder impingement syndrome is studied but the effect of Kinesiotape is not well explored. Methods: A total of 42 participants were included in the study. The subjects were assessed for SPADI, pain, proprioception, lateral scapula slide test, and pectoral minor length test at the baseline and the subjects were randomly divided into two groups. The intervention group (n = 18) received scapular taping and scapular exercises and the control group (n = 17) received scapular exercises only. Post-outcome measures were taken at 4 weeks and 12 weeks during the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for the outcome measures and Bonferroni's test was used to determine the pairwise comparisons at different measurement levels amongst experimental and control groups. Results: The study consisted of 17 males and 18 females. There was statistical significance in both groups (p < 0.01) over the 4th and 12th weeks. Pain (p < 0.01) and proprioception (p = 0.017) was also statistically significant between both the groups at 4 weeks. Conclusion: This study concludes that scapular taping can be used as an adjunct with scapular involvement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2450006
JournalJournal of Musculoskeletal Research
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2024

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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